Tag Archives: Open-Source Urbanism

HomeGrown Cities Project // URBZ

Homegrown Cities

A couple of days ago, I received an e-mail from the URBZ team, explaining the project “Homegrown cities” that they are developing in the city of Mumbai. Their thinking on the future of the cities is very much related with ideas treated in this blog, starting from the user to create a “user-generated city”.

I find their work really interesting and inspiring, so I asked them for an article to publish in the blog, changing the format of a usual entry at OSU and, hopefully, opening the blog to more extensive collaborations with outside the box urban thinkers:

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Towards an Open Source Urbanism

This blog was created with the idea of trying to make a reflection on issues that are driving a change in the approach to urban planning and the relationship between city and citizen.

Although is part of a larger project that is step by step taking shape, the fact of starting writing had been driven by a number of influences, influences that I would like to explain and recommend in this post.

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What is Tactical Urbanism bringing to the table?

Tactical Urbanism is a term used to describe small-scale urban actions aiming for a long-term impact. Is about looking for improvements in the liveability of cities in a street, block or building scale.

It includes practices that have been made for a long time, but are particularly important in the current situation, in which prevails the need for interventions of low-budget, bottom-up, involving the citizen.

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The Spontaneous City: Manifesto

Recently published, the book “The Spontaneous City” (Urhahn Urban Design, BIS Publishers) is a strong statement about the future of Urbanism. Though I am still going trough its pages, I think the interesting manifesto that opens the publication deserves a post, since in it I have found many ideas related to an open source urban design.

In the manifesto, the authors propose a change in the traditional urban planning, a new starting point by taking the city as a “marketplace” in which supply and demand from users sculpts urban form.

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